President Obama’s Inauguration Speech

My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land – a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America – they will be met.

On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things.

The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted – for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things – some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life. For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn. Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions – that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.

For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act – not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. And all this we will do.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions – who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them – that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works – whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public’s dollars will be held to account – to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day – because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control – and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous.

The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our Gross Domestic Product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart – not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake.

And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more. Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort – even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society’s ills on the West – know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us today, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends – hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism – these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility – a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.

This is the source of our confidence – the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed – why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:

“Let it be told to the future world…that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive…that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].”

America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.

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President-Elect Barack Obama’s Victory Speech

If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

It’s the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches in numbers this nation has never seen; by people who waited three hours and four hours, many for the very first time in their lives, because they believed that this time must be different; that their voice could be that difference.

It’s the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, disabled and not disabled – Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been a collection of Red States and Blue States: we are, and always will be, the United States of America.

It’s the answer that led those who have been told for so long by so many to be cynical, and fearful, and doubtful of what we can achieve to put their hands on the arc of history and bend it once more toward the hope of a better day.

It’s been a long time coming, but tonight, because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to America.

I just received a very gracious call from Senator McCain. He fought long and hard in this campaign, and he’s fought even longer and harder for the country he loves. He has endured sacrifices for America that most of us cannot begin to imagine, and we are better off for the service rendered by this brave and selfless leader. I congratulate him and Governor Palin for all they have achieved, and I look forward to working with them to renew this nation’s promise in the months ahead.

I want to thank my partner in this journey, a man who campaigned from his heart and spoke for the men and women he grew up with on the streets of Scranton and rode with on that train home to Delaware, the Vice President-elect of the United States, Joe Biden.

I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last sixteen years, the rock of our family and the love of my life, our nation’s next First Lady, Michelle Obama. Sasha and Malia, I love you both so much, and you have earned the new puppy that’s coming with us to the White House. And while she’s no longer with us, I know my grandmother is watching, along with the family that made me who I am. I miss them tonight, and know that my debt to them is beyond measure.

To my campaign manager David Plouffe, my chief strategist David Axelrod, and the best campaign team ever assembled in the history of politics – you made this happen, and I am forever grateful for what you’ve sacrificed to get it done.

But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to – it belongs to you.

I was never the likeliest candidate for this office. We didn’t start with much money or many endorsements. Our campaign was not hatched in the halls of Washington – it began in the backyards of Des Moines and the living rooms of Concord and the front porches of Charleston.

It was built by working men and women who dug into what little savings they had to give five dollars and ten dollars and twenty dollars to this cause. It grew strength from the young people who rejected the myth of their generation’s apathy; who left their homes and their families for jobs that offered little pay and less sleep; from the not-so-young people who braved the bitter cold and scorching heat to knock on the doors of perfect strangers; from the millions of Americans who volunteered, and organized, and proved that more than two centuries later, a government of the people, by the people and for the people has not perished from this Earth. This is your victory.

I know you didn’t do this just to win an election and I know you didn’t do it for me. You did it because you understand the enormity of the task that lies ahead. For even as we celebrate tonight, we know the challenges that tomorrow will bring are the greatest of our lifetime – two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. Even as we stand here tonight, we know there are brave Americans waking up in the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan to risk their lives for us. There are mothers and fathers who will lie awake after their children fall asleep and wonder how they’ll make the mortgage, or pay their doctor’s bills, or save enough for college. There is new energy to harness and new jobs to be created; new schools to build and threats to meet and alliances to repair.

The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even one term, but America – I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there. I promise you – we as a people will get there.

There will be setbacks and false starts. There are many who won’t agree with every decision or policy I make as President, and we know that government can’t solve every problem. But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face. I will listen to you, especially when we disagree. And above all, I will ask you join in the work of remaking this nation the only way it’s been done in America for two-hundred and twenty-one years – block by block, brick by brick, calloused hand by calloused hand.

What began twenty-one months ago in the depths of winter must not end on this autumn night. This victory alone is not the change we seek – it is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were. It cannot happen without you.

So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism; of service and responsibility where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves, but each other. Let us remember that if this financial crisis taught us anything, it’s that we cannot have a thriving Wall Street while Main Street suffers – in this country, we rise or fall as one nation; as one people.

Let us resist the temptation to fall back on the same partisanship and pettiness and immaturity that has poisoned our politics for so long. Let us remember that it was a man from this state who first carried the banner of the Republican Party to the White House – a party founded on the values of self-reliance, individual liberty, and national unity. Those are values we all share, and while the Democratic Party has won a great victory tonight, we do so with a measure of humility and determination to heal the divides that have held back our progress. As Lincoln said to a nation far more divided than ours, “We are not enemies, but friends…though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.” And to those Americans whose support I have yet to earn – I may not have won your vote, but I hear your voices, I need your help, and I will be your President too.

And to all those watching tonight from beyond our shores, from parliaments and palaces to those who are huddled around radios in the forgotten corners of our world – our stories are singular, but our destiny is shared, and a new dawn of American leadership is at hand. To those who would tear this world down – we will defeat you. To those who seek peace and security – we support you. And to all those who have wondered if America’s beacon still burns as bright – tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from our the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals: democracy, liberty, opportunity, and unyielding hope.

For that is the true genius of America – that America can change. Our union can be perfected. And what we have already achieved gives us hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that’s on my mind tonight is about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She’s a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing – Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn’t vote for two reasons – because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

And tonight, I think about all that she’s seen throughout her century in America – the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can’t, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

At a time when women’s voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs and a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that “We Shall Overcome.” Yes we can.

A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change. Yes we can.

America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves – if our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?

This is our chance to answer that call. This is our moment. This is our time – to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace; to reclaim the American Dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth – that out of many, we are one; that while we breathe, we hope, and where we are met with cynicism, and doubt, and those who tell us that we can’t, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people:

Yes We Can. Thank you, God bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

(text grabbed from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/uselection2008/barackobama/3383581/Barack-Obamas-victory-speech-Full-text.html)

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Full Text of Barack Obama’s Acceptance Speech

To Chairman Dean and my great friend Dick Durbin; and to all my fellow citizens of this great nation;

With profound gratitude and great humility, I accept your nomination for the presidency of the United States.

Let me express my thanks to the historic slate of candidates who accompanied me on this journey, and especially the one who traveled the farthest – a champion for working Americans and an inspiration to my daughters and to yours — Hillary Rodham Clinton. To President Clinton, who last night made the case for change as only he can make it; to Ted Kennedy, who embodies the spirit of service; and to the next Vice President of the United States, Joe Biden, I thank you. I am grateful to finish this journey with one of the finest statesmen of our time, a man at ease with everyone from world leaders to the conductors on the Amtrak train he still takes home every night.

To the love of my life, our next First Lady, Michelle Obama, and to Sasha and Malia – I love you so much, and I’m so proud of all of you.

Four years ago, I stood before you and told you my story – of the brief union between a young man from Kenya and a young woman from Kansas who weren’t well-off or well-known, but shared a belief that in America, their son could achieve whatever he put his mind to.

It is that promise that has always set this country apart – that through hard work and sacrifice, each of us can pursue our individual dreams but still come together as one American family, to ensure that the next generation can pursue their dreams as well.

That’s why I stand here tonight. Because for two hundred and thirty two years, at each moment when that promise was in jeopardy, ordinary men and women – students and soldiers, farmers and teachers, nurses and janitors — found the courage to keep it alive.

We meet at one of those defining moments – a moment when our nation is at war, our economy is in turmoil, and the American promise has been threatened once more.

Tonight, more Americans are out of work and more are working harder for less. More of you have lost your homes and even more are watching your home values plummet. More of you have cars you can’t afford to drive, credit card bills you can’t afford to pay, and tuition that’s beyond your reach.

These challenges are not all of government’s making. But the failure to respond is a direct result of a broken politics in Washington and the failed policies of George W. Bush.

America, we are better than these last eight years. We are a better country than this.

This country is more decent than one where a woman in Ohio, on the brink of retirement, finds herself one illness away from disaster after a lifetime of hard work.

This country is more generous than one where a man in Indiana has to pack up the equipment he’s worked on for twenty years and watch it shipped off to China, and then chokes up as he explains how he felt like a failure when he went home to tell his family the news.

We are more compassionate than a government that lets veterans sleep on our streets and families slide into poverty; that sits on its hands while a major American city drowns before our eyes.

Tonight, I say to the American people, to Democrats and Republicans and Independents across this great land – enough! This moment – this election – is our chance to keep, in the 21st century, the American promise alive. Because next week, in Minnesota, the same party that brought you two terms of George Bush and Dick Cheney will ask this country for a third. And we are here because we love this country too much to let the next four years look like the last eight. On November 4th, we must stand up and say: “Eight is enough.”

Now let there be no doubt. The Republican nominee, John McCain, has worn the uniform of our country with bravery and distinction, and for that we owe him our gratitude and respect. And next week, we’ll also hear about those occasions when he’s broken with his party as evidence that he can deliver the change that we need.

But the record’s clear: John McCain has voted with George Bush ninety percent of the time. Senator McCain likes to talk about judgment, but really, what does it say about your judgment when you think George Bush has been right more than ninety percent of the time? I don’t know about you, but I’m not ready to take a ten percent chance on change.

The truth is, on issue after issue that would make a difference in your lives – on health care and education and the economy – Senator McCain has been anything but independent. He said that our economy has made “great progress” under this President. He said that the fundamentals of the economy are strong. And when one of his chief advisors – the man who wrote his economic plan – was talking about the anxiety Americans are feeling, he said that we were just suffering from a “mental recession,” and that we’ve become, and I quote, “a nation of whiners.”

A nation of whiners? Tell that to the proud auto workers at a Michigan plant who, after they found out it was closing, kept showing up every day and working as hard as ever, because they knew there were people who counted on the brakes that they made. Tell that to the military families who shoulder their burdens silently as they watch their loved ones leave for their third or fourth or fifth tour of duty. These are not whiners. They work hard and give back and keep going without complaint. These are the Americans that I know.

Now, I don’t believe that Senator McCain doesn’t care what’s going on in the lives of Americans. I just think he doesn’t know. Why else would he define middle-class as someone making under five million dollars a year? How else could he propose hundreds of billions in tax breaks for big corporations and oil companies but not one penny of tax relief to more than one hundred million Americans? How else could he offer a health care plan that would actually tax people’s benefits, or an education plan that would do nothing to help families pay for college, or a plan that would privatize Social Security and gamble your retirement?

It’s not because John McCain doesn’t care. It’s because John McCain doesn’t get it.

For over two decades, he’s subscribed to that old, discredited Republican philosophy – give more and more to those with the most and hope that prosperity trickles down to everyone else. In Washington, they call this the Ownership Society, but what it really means is – you’re on your own. Out of work? Tough luck. No health care? The market will fix it. Born into poverty? Pull yourself up by your own bootstraps – even if you don’t have boots. You’re on your own.

Well it’s time for them to own their failure. It’s time for us to change America.

You see, we Democrats have a very different measure of what constitutes progress in this country.

We measure progress by how many people can find a job that pays the mortgage; whether you can put a little extra money away at the end of each month so you can someday watch your child receive her college diploma. We measure progress in the 23 million new jobs that were created when Bill Clinton was President – when the average American family saw its income go up $7,500 instead of down $2,000 like it has under George Bush.

We measure the strength of our economy not by the number of billionaires we have or the profits of the Fortune 500, but by whether someone with a good idea can take a risk and start a new business, or whether the waitress who lives on tips can take a day off to look after a sick kid without losing her job – an economy that honors the dignity of work.

The fundamentals we use to measure economic strength are whether we are living up to that fundamental promise that has made this country great – a promise that is the only reason I am standing here tonight.

Because in the faces of those young veterans who come back from Iraq and Afghanistan, I see my grandfather, who signed up after Pearl Harbor, marched in Patton’s Army, and was rewarded by a grateful nation with the chance to go to college on the GI Bill.

In the face of that young student who sleeps just three hours before working the night shift, I think about my mom, who raised my sister and me on her own while she worked and earned her degree; who once turned to food stamps but was still able to send us to the best schools in the country with the help of student loans and scholarships.

When I listen to another worker tell me that his factory has shut down, I remember all those men and women on the South Side of Chicago who I stood by and fought for two decades ago after the local steel plant closed.

And when I hear a woman talk about the difficulties of starting her own business, I think about my grandmother, who worked her way up from the secretarial pool to middle-management, despite years of being passed over for promotions because she was a woman. She’s the one who taught me about hard work. She’s the one who put off buying a new car or a new dress for herself so that I could have a better life. She poured everything she had into me. And although she can no longer travel, I know that she’s watching tonight, and that tonight is her night as well.

I don’t know what kind of lives John McCain thinks that celebrities lead, but this has been mine. These are my heroes. Theirs are the stories that shaped me. And it is on their behalf that I intend to win this election and keep our promise alive as President of the United States.

What is that promise?

It’s a promise that says each of us has the freedom to make of our own lives what we will, but that we also have the obligation to treat each other with dignity and respect.

It’s a promise that says the market should reward drive and innovation and generate growth, but that businesses should live up to their responsibilities to create American jobs, look out for American workers, and play by the rules of the road.

Ours is a promise that says government cannot solve all our problems, but what it should do is that which we cannot do for ourselves – protect us from harm and provide every child a decent education; keep our water clean and our toys safe; invest in new schools and new roads and new science and technology.

Our government should work for us, not against us. It should help us, not hurt us. It should ensure opportunity not just for those with the most money and influence, but for every American who’s willing to work.

That’s the promise of America – the idea that we are responsible for ourselves, but that we also rise or fall as one nation; the fundamental belief that I am my brother’s keeper; I am my sister’s keeper.

That’s the promise we need to keep. That’s the change we need right now. So let me spell out exactly what that change would mean if I am President.
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Change means a tax code that doesn’t reward the lobbyists who wrote it, but the American workers and small businesses who deserve it.

Unlike John McCain, I will stop giving tax breaks to corporations that ship jobs overseas, and I will start giving them to companies that create good jobs right here in America.

I will eliminate capital gains taxes for the small businesses and the start-ups that will create the high-wage, high-tech jobs of tomorrow.

I will cut taxes – cut taxes – for 95% of all working families. Because in an economy like this, the last thing we should do is raise taxes on the middle-class.

And for the sake of our economy, our security, and the future of our planet, I will set a clear goal as President: in ten years, we will finally end our dependence on oil from the Middle East.

Washington’s been talking about our oil addiction for the last thirty years, and John McCain has been there for twenty-six of them. In that time, he’s said no to higher fuel-efficiency standards for cars, no to investments in renewable energy, no to renewable fuels. And today, we import triple the amount of oil as the day that Senator McCain took office.

Now is the time to end this addiction, and to understand that drilling is a stop-gap measure, not a long-term solution. Not even close.

As President, I will tap our natural gas reserves, invest in clean coal technology, and find ways to safely harness nuclear power. I’ll help our auto companies re-tool, so that the fuel-efficient cars of the future are built right here in America. I’ll make it easier for the American people to afford these new cars. And I’ll invest 150 billion dollars over the next decade in affordable, renewable sources of energy – wind power and solar power and the next generation of biofuels; an investment that will lead to new industries and five million new jobs that pay well and can’t ever be outsourced.

America, now is not the time for small plans.

Now is the time to finally meet our moral obligation to provide every child a world-class education, because it will take nothing less to compete in the global economy. Michelle and I are only here tonight because we were given a chance at an education. And I will not settle for an America where some kids don’t have that chance. I’ll invest in early childhood education. I’ll recruit an army of new teachers, and pay them higher salaries and give them more support. And in exchange, I’ll ask for higher standards and more accountability. And we will keep our promise to every young American – if you commit to serving your community or your country, we will make sure you can afford a college education.

Now is the time to finally keep the promise of affordable, accessible health care for every single American. If you have health care, my plan will lower your premiums. If you don’t, you’ll be able to get the same kind of coverage that members of Congress give themselves. And as someone who watched my mother argue with insurance companies while she lay in bed dying of cancer, I will make certain those companies stop discriminating against those who are sick and need care the most.

Now is the time to help families with paid sick days and better family leave, because nobody in America should have to choose between keeping their jobs and caring for a sick child or ailing parent.

Now is the time to change our bankruptcy laws, so that your pensions are protected ahead of CEO bonuses; and the time to protect Social Security for future generations.

And now is the time to keep the promise of equal pay for an equal day’s work, because I want my daughters to have exactly the same opportunities as your sons.

Now, many of these plans will cost money, which is why I’ve laid out how I’ll pay for every dime – by closing corporate loopholes and tax havens that don’t help America grow. But I will also go through the federal budget, line by line, eliminating programs that no longer work and making the ones we do need work better and cost less – because we cannot meet twenty-first century challenges with a twentieth century bureaucracy.

And Democrats, we must also admit that fulfilling America’s promise will require more than just money. It will require a renewed sense of responsibility from each of us to recover what John F. Kennedy called our “intellectual and moral strength.” Yes, government must lead on energy independence, but each of us must do our part to make our homes and businesses more efficient. Yes, we must provide more ladders to success for young men who fall into lives of crime and despair. But we must also admit that programs alone can’t replace parents; that government can’t turn off the television and make a child do her homework; that fathers must take more responsibility for providing the love and guidance their children need.

Individual responsibility and mutual responsibility – that’s the essence of America’s promise.

And just as we keep our keep our promise to the next generation here at home, so must we keep America’s promise abroad. If John McCain wants to have a debate about who has the temperament, and judgment, to serve as the next Commander-in-Chief, that’s a debate I’m ready to have.

For while Senator McCain was turning his sights to Iraq just days after 9/11, I stood up and opposed this war, knowing that it would distract us from the real threats we face. When John McCain said we could just “muddle through” in Afghanistan, I argued for more resources and more troops to finish the fight against the terrorists who actually attacked us on 9/11, and made clear that we must take out Osama bin Laden and his lieutenants if we have them in our sights. John McCain likes to say that he’ll follow bin Laden to the Gates of Hell – but he won’t even go to the cave where he lives.

And today, as my call for a time frame to remove our troops from Iraq has been echoed by the Iraqi government and even the Bush Administration, even after we learned that Iraq has a $79 billion surplus while we’re wallowing in deficits, John McCain stands alone in his stubborn refusal to end a misguided war.

That’s not the judgment we need. That won’t keep America safe. We need a President who can face the threats of the future, not keep grasping at the ideas of the past.

You don’t defeat a terrorist network that operates in eighty countries by occupying Iraq. You don’t protect Israel and deter Iran just by talking tough in Washington. You can’t truly stand up for Georgia when you’ve strained our oldest alliances. If John McCain wants to follow George Bush with more tough talk and bad strategy, that is his choice – but it is not the change we need.

We are the party of Roosevelt. We are the party of Kennedy. So don’t tell me that Democrats won’t defend this country. Don’t tell me that Democrats won’t keep us safe. The Bush-McCain foreign policy has squandered the legacy that generations of Americans — Democrats and Republicans – have built, and we are here to restore that legacy.

As Commander-in-Chief, I will never hesitate to defend this nation, but I will only send our troops into harm’s way with a clear mission and a sacred commitment to give them the equipment they need in battle and the care and benefits they deserve when they come home.

I will end this war in Iraq responsibly, and finish the fight against al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan. I will rebuild our military to meet future conflicts. But I will also renew the tough, direct diplomacy that can prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons and curb Russian aggression. I will build new partnerships to defeat the threats of the 21st century: terrorism and nuclear proliferation; poverty and genocide; climate change and disease. And I will restore our moral standing, so that America is once again that last, best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom, who long for lives of peace, and who yearn for a better future.

These are the policies I will pursue. And in the weeks ahead, I look forward to debating them with John McCain.

But what I will not do is suggest that the Senator takes his positions for political purposes. Because one of the things that we have to change in our politics is the idea that people cannot disagree without challenging each other’s character and patriotism.

The times are too serious, the stakes are too high for this same partisan playbook. So let us agree that patriotism has no party. I love this country, and so do you, and so does John McCain. The men and women who serve in our battlefields may be Democrats and Republicans and Independents, but they have fought together and bled together and some died together under the same proud flag. They have not served a Red America or a Blue America – they have served the United States of America.

So I’ve got news for you, John McCain. We all put our country first.

America, our work will not be easy. The challenges we face require tough choices, and Democrats as well as Republicans will need to cast off the worn-out ideas and politics of the past. For part of what has been lost these past eight years can’t just be measured by lost wages or bigger trade deficits. What has also been lost is our sense of common purpose – our sense of higher purpose. And that’s what we have to restore.

We may not agree on abortion, but surely we can agree on reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies in this country. The reality of gun ownership may be different for hunters in rural Ohio than for those plagued by gang-violence in Cleveland, but don’t tell me we can’t uphold the Second Amendment while keeping AK-47s out of the hands of criminals. I know there are differences on same-sex marriage, but surely we can agree that our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters deserve to visit the person they love in the hospital and to live lives free of discrimination. Passions fly on immigration, but I don’t know anyone who benefits when a mother is separated from her infant child or an employer undercuts American wages by hiring illegal workers. This too is part of America’s promise – the promise of a democracy where we can find the strength and grace to bridge divides and unite in common effort.

I know there are those who dismiss such beliefs as happy talk. They claim that our insistence on something larger, something firmer and more honest in our public life is just a Trojan Horse for higher taxes and the abandonment of traditional values. And that’s to be expected. Because if you don’t have any fresh ideas, then you use stale tactics to scare the voters. If you don’t have a record to run on, then you paint your opponent as someone people should run from.

You make a big election about small things.

And you know what – it’s worked before. Because it feeds into the cynicism we all have about government. When Washington doesn’t work, all its promises seem empty. If your hopes have been dashed again and again, then it’s best to stop hoping, and settle for what you already know.

I get it. I realize that I am not the likeliest candidate for this office. I don’t fit the typical pedigree, and I haven’t spent my career in the halls of Washington.

But I stand before you tonight because all across America something is stirring. What the nay-sayers don’t understand is that this election has never been about me. It’s been about you.

For eighteen long months, you have stood up, one by one, and said enough to the politics of the past. You understand that in this election, the greatest risk we can take is to try the same old politics with the same old players and expect a different result. You have shown what history teaches us – that at defining moments like this one, the change we need doesn’t come from Washington. Change comes to Washington. Change happens because the American people demand it – because they rise up and insist on new ideas and new leadership, a new politics for a new time.

America, this is one of those moments.

I believe that as hard as it will be, the change we need is coming. Because I’ve seen it. Because I’ve lived it. I’ve seen it in Illinois, when we provided health care to more children and moved more families from welfare to work. I’ve seen it in Washington, when we worked across party lines to open up government and hold lobbyists more accountable, to give better care for our veterans and keep nuclear weapons out of terrorist hands.

And I’ve seen it in this campaign. In the young people who voted for the first time, and in those who got involved again after a very long time. In the Republicans who never thought they’d pick up a Democratic ballot, but did. I’ve seen it in the workers who would rather cut their hours back a day than see their friends lose their jobs, in the soldiers who re-enlist after losing a limb, in the good neighbors who take a stranger in when a hurricane strikes and the floodwaters rise.

This country of ours has more wealth than any nation, but that’s not what makes us rich. We have the most powerful military on Earth, but that’s not what makes us strong. Our universities and our culture are the envy of the world, but that’s not what keeps the world coming to our shores.

Instead, it is that American spirit – that American promise – that pushes us forward even when the path is uncertain; that binds us together in spite of our differences; that makes us fix our eye not on what is seen, but what is unseen, that better place around the bend.

That promise is our greatest inheritance. It’s a promise I make to my daughters when I tuck them in at night, and a promise that you make to yours – a promise that has led immigrants to cross oceans and pioneers to travel west; a promise that led workers to picket lines, and women to reach for the ballot.

And it is that promise that forty five years ago today, brought Americans from every corner of this land to stand together on a Mall in Washington, before Lincoln’s Memorial, and hear a young preacher from Georgia speak of his dream.

The men and women who gathered there could’ve heard many things. They could’ve heard words of anger and discord. They could’ve been told to succumb to the fear and frustration of so many dreams deferred.

But what the people heard instead – people of every creed and color, from every walk of life – is that in America, our destiny is inextricably linked. That together, our dreams can be one.

“We cannot walk alone,” the preacher cried. “And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back.”

America, we cannot turn back. Not with so much work to be done. Not with so many children to educate, and so many veterans to care for. Not with an economy to fix and cities to rebuild and farms to save. Not with so many families to protect and so many lives to mend. America, we cannot turn back. We cannot walk alone. At this moment, in this election, we must pledge once more to march into the future. Let us keep that promise – that American promise – and in the words of Scripture hold firmly, without wavering, to the hope that we confess.

Thank you, God Bless you, and God Bless the United States of America.

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Blog Lecture No. 83: Powers of Attorney

Finally, another opportunity to conduct a blog-lecture, just to bust some myths:

What are powers of attorney?

These are documents or contracts to establish an agency relationship between a principal and an agent.

So what is a contract of agency?

Article 1868 of the Civil Code of the Philippines states: “By the contract of agency a person binds himself to render some service or to do something in representation or on behalf of another, with the consent or authority of the latter.”

So what is it in English?

The key word in the definition above is “representation.” By the contract of agency, a principal allows his agent to act on his behalf, as if the principal is the one acting.

By this contract (generally called a power of attorney), an agent does something or acts on something, such as enters into contracts, not on his own name by in the name of his principal.

According to the Merriam Webster online dictionary, an attorney is one who is legally appointed to transact business on another’s behalf. Hence the name “power of attorney”

Distinguish this from an “attorney-at-law” which refers to lawyers, who are persons authorized by the court to transact business in it. Think of us as similar to “certified public accountants.” Anyone can be an attorney, if authorized by someone else, just as anyone can be an accountant. But being an attorney-at-law is a different matter, like a certified public accountant, we have to pass some stringent standard and specifically authorized by the government to practice such a profession.

So the myth that only lawyers can be given powers of attorney is simply not true. Those authorizations you give to your messengers to encash your paychecks makes such messengers your attorneys.

What are the kinds of powers of attorney?

They are:

(1) General
(2) Special

What’s the difference between the two?

Simply put, a special power of attorney authorizes the agent to do specific tasks and functions.

A general power of attorney is broader and should be given only sparingly because the principal will authorize his agent to do almost everything on his behalf.

As stated by the law (Article 1876), a general power of attorney comprises all the business of the principal, a special power of attorney, one or more specific transactions.

Why did you say a general power of attorney will authorize an agent to do almost everything in his behalf?

I said almost everything because under the law (Article 1877, to be exact):

An agency couched in general terms comprises only acts of administration, even if the principal should state that he withholds no power or that the agent may execute such acts as he may consider appropriate, or even though the agency should authorize a general and unlimited management.

This means, an agent, even if given a general power of attorney, cannot do acts of ownership over the principal’s properties, unless specifically authorized in the general power of attorney over a specific property. In which case, that document becomes a special power of attorney already, insofar as that specific property and transaction is concerned.

Acts of ownership include, sale, mortgage or any other incumbrance over properties.

So where are special powers of attorney necessary?

These are necessary over the following cases, according to Article 1878:

1) To make such payments as are not usually considered as acts of administration;

2) To effect novations which put an end to obligations already in existence at the time the agency was constituted;

3) To compromise, to submit questions to arbitration, to renounce the right to appeal from a judgment, to waive objections to the venue of an action or to abandon a prescription already acquired;

4) To waive any obligation gratuitously;

5) To enter into any contract by which the ownership of an immovable is transmitted or acquired either gratuitously or for a valuable consideration;

6) To make gifts, except customary ones for charity or those made to employees in the business managed by the agent;

7) To loan or borrow money, unless the latter act be urgent and indispensable for the preservation of the things which are under administration;

8) To lease any real property to another person for more than one year;

9) To bind the principal to render some service without compensation;

10) To bind the principal in a contract of partnership;

11) To obligate the principal as a guarantor or surety;

12) To create or convey real rights over immovable property;

13) To accept or repudiate an inheritance;

14) To ratify or recognize obligations contracted before the agency;

15) Any other act of strict dominion.

So why is the DOJ doing something good for a change and warning the victims of the recent tragedy about blindly signing special powers of attorney?
More likewise, these special powers of attorney contain a specific authority to collect the money being given by the shipper and sign the quitclaim on the victim’s (or the heirs’) behalf, and because they signed that special power of attorney, they will be bound (and they have to honor) anything the appointed agent does on their behalf.

Also, the so-called special power of attorney had the name of the agent in blank. It’s like signing a blank check. Anybody (not any lawyer, as the myth perpetuates) can sign his name as their agent, collect the money and compromise their claim and then, may not even give them their money, because they don’t even know who they appointed as agent.

So again, what is the myth you wanted busted?

The myth is only lawyers can be given special powers of attorney. An “attorney” in this document simple means representative and anyone, not necessarily a lawyer, can be a representative, an attorney of another given this document.

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Blog Lecture No. 82: Presumptions

Sorry, class! Been a long time since I last lectured.

Given the recent events, I almost never wanted to lecture again.

But anyway here goes:

What are the kinds of presumptions in law?

They are:

1) Conclusive Presumptions; and
2) Disputable Presumptions

(From Rule 131 of the Rules of Evidence)

What are conclusive presumptions?

These are presumptions that cannot be overturned or disproved, even with contrary evidence, even if present.

What are these conclusive presumptions?

They are:

(a) Whenever a party has, by his own declaration, act, or omission, intentionally and deliberately led to another to believe a particular thing true, and to act upon such belief, he cannot, in any litigation arising out of such declaration, act or omission, be permitted to falsify it.

(This is essentially estoppel. If one acts on a misrepresentation by one party, that party is not permitted to dispute it.)

(b) The tenant is not permitted to deny the title of his landlord at the time of commencement of the relation of landlord and tenant between them.

(Simply put, a tenant, by agreeing to lease something, cannot say later on that his landlord does not own the thing leased in the first place.)

What are disputable presumptions?

These are presumptions that would remain true only if uncontradicted.

What are these disputable presumptions?

(a) That a person is innocent of crime or wrong;

(b) That an unlawful act was done with an unlawful intent;

(c) That a person intends the ordinary consequences of his voluntary act;

(d) That a person takes ordinary care of his concerns;

(e) That evidence willfully suppressed would be adverse if produced;

(f) That money paid by one to another was due to the latter;

(g) That a thing delivered by one to another belonged to the latter;

(h) That an obligation delivered up to the debtor has been paid;

(i) That prior rents or installments had been paid when a receipt for the later one is produced;

(j) That a person found in possession of a thing taken in the doing of a recent wrongful act is the taker and the doer of the whole act; otherwise, that things which a person possess, or exercises acts of ownership over, are owned by him;

(k) That a person in possession of an order on himself for the payment of the money, or the delivery of anything, has paid the money or delivered the thing accordingly;

(l) That a person acting in a public office was regularly appointed or elected to it;

(m) That official duty has been regularly performed;

(n) That a court, or judge acting as such, whether in the Philippines or elsewhere, was acting in the lawful exercise of jurisdiction;

(o) That all the matters within an issue raised in a case were laid before the court and passed upon by it; and in like manner that all matters within an issue raised in a dispute submitted for arbitration were laid before the arbitrators and passed upon by them;

(p) That private transactions have been fair and regular;

(q) That the ordinary course of business has been followed;

(r) That there was a sufficient consideration for a contract;

(s) That a negotiable instrument was given or indorsed for a sufficient consideration;

(t) That an endorsement of negotiable instrument was made before the instrument was overdue and at the place where the instrument is dated;

(u) That a writing is truly dated;

(v) That a letter duly directed and mailed was received in the regular course of the mail;

(w) That after an absence of seven years, it being unknown whether or not the absentee still lives, he is considered dead for all purposes, except for those of succession.

  • The absentee shall not be considered dead for the purpose of opening his succession till after an absence of ten years. If he disappeared after the age of seventy-five years, an absence of five years shall be sufficient in order that his succession may be opened.
  • The following shall be considered dead for all purposes including the division of the estate among the heirs:
  • (1) A person on board a vessel lost during a sea voyage, or an aircraft with is missing, who has not been heard of for four years since the loss of the vessel or aircraft;
  • (2) A member of the armed forces who has taken part in armed hostilities, and has been missing for four years;
  • (3) A person who has been in danger of death under other circumstances and whose existence has not been known for four years;
  • (4) If a married person has been absent for four consecutive years, the spouse present may contract a subsequent marriage if he or she has well-founded belief that the absent spouse is already death. In case of disappearance, where there is a danger of death the circumstances hereinabove provided, an absence of only two years shall be sufficient for the purpose of contracting a subsequent marriage. However, in any case, before marrying again, the spouse present must institute a summary proceedings as provided in the Family Code and in the rules for declaration of presumptive death of the absentee, without prejudice to the effect of reappearance of the absent spouse.
(x) That acquiescence resulted from a belief that the thing acquiesced in was conformable to the law or fact;

(y) That things have happened according to the ordinary course of nature and ordinary nature habits of life;

(z) That persons acting as copartners have entered into a contract of copartneship;

(aa) That a man and woman deporting themselves as husband and wife have entered into a lawful contract of marriage;

(bb) That property acquired by a man and a woman who are capacitated to marry each other and who live exclusively with each other as husband and wife without the benefit of marriage or under void marriage, has been obtained by their joint efforts, work or industry.

(cc) That in cases of cohabitation by a man and a woman who are not capacitated to marry each other and who have acquire properly through their actual joint contribution of money, property or industry, such contributions and their corresponding shares including joint deposits of money and evidences of credit are equal.

(dd) That if the marriage is terminated and the mother contracted another marriage within three hundred days after such termination of the former marriage, these rules shall govern in the absence of proof to the contrary:

  • (1) A child born before one hundred eighty days after the solemnization of the subsequent marriage is considered to have been conceived during such marriage, even though it be born within the three hundred days after the termination of the former marriage.
  • (2) A child born after one hundred eighty days following the celebration of the subsequent marriage is considered to have been conceived during such marriage, even though it be born within the three hundred days after the termination of the former marriage.
(ee) That a thing once proved to exist continues as long as is usual with things of the nature;

(ff) That the law has been obeyed;

(gg) That a printed or published book, purporting to be printed or published by public authority, was so printed or published;

(hh) That a printed or published book, purporting contain reports of cases adjudged in tribunals of the country where the book is published, contains correct reports of such cases;

(ii) That a trustee or other person whose duty it was to convey real property to a particular person has actually conveyed it to him when such presumption is necessary to perfect the title of such person or his successor in interest;

(jj) That except for purposes of succession, when two persons perish in the same calamity, such as wreck, battle, or conflagration, and it is not shown who died first, and there are no particular circumstances from which it can be inferred, the survivorship is determined from the probabilities resulting from the strength and the age of the sexes, according to the following rules:

  • 1. If both were under the age of fifteen years, the older is deemed to have survived;
  • 2. If both were above the age sixty, the younger is deemed to have survived;
  • 3. If one is under fifteen and the other above sixty, the former is deemed to have survived;
  • 4. If both be over fifteen and under sixty, and the sex be different, the male is deemed to have survived, if the sex be the same, the older;
  • 5. If one be under fifteen or over sixty, and the other between those ages, the latter is deemed to have survived.

(kk) That if there is a doubt, as between two or more persons who are called to succeed each other, as to which of them died first, whoever alleges the death of one prior to the other, shall prove the same; in the absence of proof, they shall be considered to have died at the same time.

Is there a presumption of regularity of board or stockholder meetings?

Of course not! Whoever said that must be referring to another law book!

Is there a presumption of regularity of official acts?

Yes, under it is letter (m) of the disputable presumptions. But this only means regularity of official acts is presumed, unless disproved.

So who is right? SEC or MERALCO?

We have to presume SEC is correct this time because of this presumption and the presumption next to it that says “a court, or judge acting as such, whether in the Philippines or elsewhere, was acting in the lawful exercise of jurisdiction.” MERALCO does not enjoy the same presumption, despite what one misguided columnist says.

Any other allegation of MERALCO of and SEC irregularity must bow to this presumption, until it can present proof to the contrary.

What is your basic fear then it comes to citing MERALCO in contempt?

I fear the fines SEC will impose will be passed on as “systems loss.” So I hope SEC cites the officers personally in contempt, not MERALCO if it so decides.

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2008 New Lawyers

Here is the result of the 2007 Bar Examinations

2007 BAR EXAMINATIONS

LIST OF SUCCESSFUL EXAMINEES

1. ABALUS, Karen Anne M.
2. ABARDO-ESTRADA, Imee M.
3. ABARQUEZ, Carlo E.
4. ABDULLAH, Princess Shanihar A.
5. ABELLA, Johanna R.
6. ABISO, Meriame Joy D.
7. ABLOLA, Maricez J.
8. ABUNDABAR, Rhys Michael S.
9. ACEDILLO, Noelle T.
10. ACENA, Anna Cecilia D.
11. ACERET, Shantel P.
12. ACERO, Francis Euston R.
13. ACHARON, Paolo Jay S.
14. ACHAS, Anne Lourdes R.
15. ACLAN, Jennie C.
16. ACOSTA, JR., Isagani S.
17. ADIN, Fatima Irene T.
18. ADIOVA, Agnes Z.
19. ADLAO, Joyce P.
20. ADRIOSULA, Dino M.
21. AFRICA, Cecille Marie A.
22. AGAMATA, Abraham A.
23. AGDA, JR., Victoriano T.
24. AGONCILLO, Gildu R.
25. AGOR, Cesar A.
26. AGPAOA, Magnum D.
27. AGTARAP, Jeffrey M.
28. AGUAVIVA, Ma. Aileen G.
29. AGULAY, JR., Norberto S.
30. AGUNOS, Farah C.
31. AGUSTIN, Oliver P.
32. AGUSTIN, Ronesito B.
33. AKILITH, Joseph A.
34. ALADIN-VIDALLO, Rhia N.
35. ALAGABAN, Cherilee B.
36. ALAPOT, Jeofrey R.
37. ALAYON, Marivic M.
38. ALBAO, Ismael A.
39. ALBAYTAR, Mylene C.
40. ALCASABAS, Ramon Manolo A.
41. ALDOVINO, Farah A.
42. ALEJANDRE, Maria Zenaida F.
43. ALEJANDRO, Elsie A.
44. ALFONSO, Maria Kathrina C.
45. ALFONSO, Ramon M.
46. ALILING, Jose Percival Z.
47. ALIMA, Joel A.
48. ALINAO, Michael A.
49. ALINAS, Milber G.
50. ALINOG, Joanah C.
51. ALIPAO, Ligaya G.
52. ALIPUDDIN, Jamecia S.
53. ALIÑO, Dennis C.
54. ALMAZORA, Madelyn Joy S.
55. ALMEDA, John Voltaire A.
56. ALMODAL, Jezebel L.
57. ALOJADO, Rommero O.
58. ALONG, Angela Sigrid J.
59. ALONTE, Ruby Christine C.
60. ALONTO, II, Abdul Gaffur Madki M.
61. ALONZO, Angelita B.
62. ALTAMIA, Eden M.
63. ALVAERA, Joseph Vincent B.
64. ALVAREZ, Ethel L.
65. ALVAREZ, Katrina Anne F.
66. ALVAREZ, Mercedes K.
67. ALVIAR, Myrvilen L.
68. AMADA, Aileen E.
69. AMATONG, Aldren Raye A.
70. AMBATALI, Marian Kristine V.
71. AMOLATA, Apple Cherrie S.
72. AMPARO, Maria Lourdes G.
73. AMPON, Dennis R.
74. ANARNA, Jinky Y.
75. ANCHETA, Ari N.
76. ANDAYOG, Michael S.
77. ANG, Alli T.
78. ANGEL, Joseph Angelo D.
79. ANGELES, Anna Asuncion P.
80. ANGELES, Ela DV.
81. ANGUSTIA, Joseph Domingo M.
82. ANICETE, Alexander Philip C.
83. ANILLO-JACINTO, Ma. Cristina P.
84. ANONGOS, Juliana N.
85. ANTONANO, Essy Genebelle B.
86. ANTONIO, Dan David Vincent D.
87. ANTONIO, Giovanni J.
88. ANTONIO, Michelle M.
89. ANTONIO, Rowena A.
90. APOLINARIO, Anissa P.
91. APOLINARIO, Odilon A.
92. APOLONIO, Katherine G.
93. APOLONIO, III, Alfonso A.
94. APOSTOL, JR., Manolito M.
95. APRUEBO, Violet M.
96. AQUINO, Aristotle R.
97. AQUINO, Loly C.
98. AQUINO, Ma. Carina A.
99. AQUINO, Mary Ann Gretchen U.
100. AQUINO, Noe T.
101. AQUINO-BUÑO, Mimi L.
102. ARBUES, Christian M.
103. ARCEGA, Cesar Arnel M.
104. ARCENAS, Ernie B.
105. ARCHIVAL, Al John M.
106. ARCOS, Dante L.
107. ARDAÑA, Benju V.
108. ARENAS, Maria Diana S.
109. AREVALO, Edgard A.
110. ARIMBOYUTAN, JR., William D.
111. ARIOLA, Rendey D.
112. ARITAO, Benjamin Lawrence P E.
113. ARRIOLA, Roy J.
114. ARSITIO, Robin R.
115. ARUGAY, Roman C.
116. ASCALON, Maki-angel O.
117. ASENCIO, Valentina J.
118. ASENCION, Lincoln R.
119. ASERIT, Ma. Girlie B.
120. ASETRE, Ivy V.
121. ASINAS, Neilster Jon S.
122. ASPA, Franz Raymond P.
123. ASTIH, Pakhruddin M.
124. AURELLANA, Rinchel E.
125. AUSTRIA, Norman B.
126. AVANCE, Candy T.
127. AYSON, JR., Ruben S.
128. BACAL, Noel G.
129. BACALLA, Noel O.
130. BACELONIA, Joy Anne V.
131. BACONGA, Saturnino N.
132. BACORRO, Lianne M.
133. BADIOLA, Alan V.
134. BAGALOYOS, Anne Jamaica E.
135. BAGUIO, Mario P.
136. BAJA, Mariel D.
137. BAKINO, Suseyline M.
138. BALA, Jerwin D.
139. BALANAY, Ruena D.
140. BALAO-AS, John B.
141. BALAOING, Emman B.
142. BALBA, Jennifer M.
143. BALBANERO, Michael A.
144. BALDO, Ma. Aimee E.
145. BALDONADO, Neil Energyte G.
146. BALDOS, Catherine A.
147. BALEIN, Mignonette Emelaine Gail D.
148. BALO, Ted Andrew M.
149. BALOT, Dexter M.
150. BALTAO, Kimberly May F.
151. BALUYOT, Rosario R.
152. BAMBO, Ulysses G.
153. BANAUAG, Boris Maria T.
154. BANAWA, Frayn M.
155. BANAYBANAY, Clarissa Idris G.
156. BANTILAN, JR., Paterno T.
157. BAQUILOD, Clara A.
158. BARCELLANO, JR., Julio D.
159. BARRIOS, Karla Maria F.
160. BARRIOS, Manuel Isidro Rosauro V.
161. BARROSO, Rachel Rueve Marie T.
162. BARSAGA, JR., Nilo P.
163. BARTOLOME, Sheryl G.
164. BARUT, Maribel L.
165. BASALLAJE, Eva Bernardette V.
166. BASAS, Joseph Melvin B.
167. BASCO, Neil Sam L.
168. BASCO, Reynante B.
169. BASQUIÑEZ, Flora Sherry M.
170. BASTASA, Michellee C.
171. BATAY, Rosalyn D.
172. BATICULON, Blanchie T.
173. BATOCAEL-DOMINGO, Faye T.
174. BAUTISTA, Antonio Carlos B.
175. BAUTISTA, Irvin A.
176. BAUTISTA, Jackie Lou C.
177. BAUTISTA, Maria Teresa I.
178. BAUTISTA, Patricia Lee Alexandra M.
179. BAYLON, Melvin P.
180. BAYOT, Rocherrie S.
181. BEJER, Louise Dianne A.
182. BEJOC-CARANDANG, Florence G.
183. BELORIA, JR., Cesar B.
184. BELTRAN, Leonard M.
185. BELZA, Mary Angieline L.
186. BEN, Noel A.
187. BENITEZ, Ferdinand S.
188. BENITEZ, Victor Esteban S.
189. BENTULAN, Jeremias A.
190. BERMUDEZ, Ronaldo O.
191. BERNADES, Dexter Niño E.
192. BERNADOS, Cresente C.
193. BERNAL, June Ann Q.
194. BERNAL, Rj A.
195. BERNAL, Victor Marc B.
196. BERNARDO, Rommel M.
197. BILLONES-IBARDOLAZA, Maria Genalyn T.
198. BILOCURA, Nathaniel B.
199. BINALAY, Maria Florinia B.
200. BINAYAN, Darcy M.
201. BITARA, Francis Rael C.
202. BLANCO, Mark Philip B.
203. BLANQUISCO, Sherryl R.
204. BLANZA, Randy B.
205. BOADO, Armi-lynn Kristine H.
206. BOCAR, Vida Zora G.
207. BOCO, Jimmy B.
208. BOJOS, Anna Fionah L.
209. BOLIVAR, Amy Grace O.
210. BOLIVAR-AMONCIO, Anna Marie Josette A.
211. BOLLIDO, Ma. Corazon P.
212. BOMBASE, Paulo N.
213. BONGAT, Joanna S.
214. BONIFACIO, Marie Eugenie Grace M.
215. BONSOL, Mary Grace S.
216. BONTIGAO-BAGUE, Maria Estela H.
217. BORBON, Alyssa Benetta L.
218. BORGONIA, John Ismael B.
219. BORJA, Karl Frederick S.
220. BORJA, Ruel P.
221. BOTIGAN, Maria Cristina C.
222. BRAGADO, Marijoy B.
223. BRAGAS, Diane Karen B.
224. BRILLANTES, Love Joy Cecilia C.
225. BRIONES, Joyce M.
226. BRIONES, Leo Santiago M.
227. BRITANICO, Francesco C.
228. BRITO, Edita
229. BUENAVISTA, Ryan S.
230. BUENCAMINO, Christine Marie V.
231. BUENDIA, Terence P.
232. BUENVIAJE, Ernest Ian S.
233. BUGAYONG, Allan Rheynier D.
234. BULATAO, Sheryl Grace G.
235. BULONG, JR., Joaquin N.
236. BULSECO, Cheslyn Claire C.
237. BULSECO, III, Francisco S.
238. BURGOS, Jo Ann M.
239. BUSLAYAN, JR., Romeo F.
240. BUSTOS, Janina Lourdes S.
241. BUZETA-ACERO, Andre Ria B.
242. CABAILO-ALDEA, Ethelwolda A.
243. CABALHUG, JR., Antonio J.
244. CABANLAS, Dick Carlo J.
245. CABANTOG, Amylaine R.
246. CABARABAN, Maria Cielo Shanidar C.
247. CABEL, Karla T.
248. CABILES, Jo Aileen A.
249. CABRAL, III, Ricardo Felix C.
250. CABUHAT, Mary Ellen S.
251. CACABELOS, Karren Maricris G.
252. CACERES, Rowena C.
253. CADIZ, Manuel Cesar Reno S.
254. CALAYAN, Deanna Maria Rachel S.
255. CALINGIN, Carlomagno N.
256. CALIPES, Bhavelyn S.
257. CALIZO, Brian M.
258. CALLANTA, Eduardo G.
259. CALSEÑA, Mariedith B.
260. CALSIYAO, JR., Ceferino B.
261. CALUMBA, Edelene Grace S.
262. CAMANGEG, Cristel Marie G.
263. CAMELON, III, Renato M.
264. CAMORA, Gloria A.
265. CAMPOS, JR., Napoleon P.
266. CAMPOSANO, Catherine A.
267. CAMUA, Roger Terence P.
268. CANCEKO, Eileen Joy P.
269. CANONIGO-GAN, Catherine C.
270. CANSINO, III, Emilio P.
271. CANTAROS, JR., Rufino C.
272. CANULLAS, Karen S.
273. CAOAYAN, Wenceslao R.
274. CAPACITE-BALLAIS, Gissle Gay A.
275. CARANTES, John Carlo E.
276. CARIÑO, Maria Elena E.
277. CARLOTA, JR., Mariano P.
278. CARPINA, Iris M.
279. CARPIO, Benedicto R.
280. CARREON, III, Cesar R.
281. CARTAGENA, Benedict S.
282. CARUNGCONG, Jonathan R.
283. CASABAR, Alezandro S.
284. CASANGKAPAN, Antonio C.
285. CASEÑAS, Ma. Goretti V.
286. CASIMIRO, Orlando Paolo F.
287. CASTAÑEDA, Kristina P.
288. CASTAÑOS, Chester C.
289. CASTIGADOR, Alex C.
290. CASTILLO, Eilyn Beverly Bless L.
291. CASTILLO, Jocelyn Perolina
292. CASTILLO, Marlon William M.
293. CASTILLO-LORENZO, Cesaria Dane D.
294. CASTRO, Fernand A.
295. CASTRO, Jesselito L.
296. CASTRO, Rainela D.
297. CAUDANG, Hashreen T.
298. CAVADA, Glenn M.
299. CAVISTANY, Debbie Liezl B.
300. CAYABYAB, Pamela Ann T.
301. CAYBOT, Cristina V.
302. CAÑAS, Reginildo R.
303. CELINO, Sarah Eufrosina D.
304. CENABRE, Ethan Allen F.
305. CEQUENA, Levie Lyn C.
306. CERILLO, Maria Theresa A.
307. CERVANTES, Paul Christian M.
308. CERVANTES-CABALATUNGAN, Milajoy D.
309. CHAN, Jordanne B.
310. CHAVEZ, Marvin Gregory R.
311. CHAVEZ, III, Cesar Angelo A.
312. CHENG, Charles Edward M.
313. CHING, Ronald Segundino C.
314. CHING, III, Benito S.
315. CHIONG, Naomi C.
316. CHIU, Karol Joseph P.
317. CHU, Emilio C.
318. CLAMOR, Antonette P.
319. CLARA, Barbra Jill B.
320. CLARAVALL, VI, Francisco M.
321. CO, Evangeline M.
322. CO, Karl Steven A.
323. CO, Rosalyn S.
324. CO, Ryan D.
325. CODA-MAMUKID, Monalisa B.
326. COLET, Juan Paolo E.
327. COLICO, Cristina T.
328. COMPETENTE, Joenel R.
329. CONALES, Christie Anne S.
330. CONCEPCION-MORAN, Juliana G.
331. CONCHA, Diana Charlette G.
332. CONCHA, Susan Espera L.
333. CONCHA, Val Angelo C.
334. CONSTANTINO, Pillar L.
335. COPAHAN, Levie U.
336. CORCEGA, Mediner M.
337. CORDERO, Felicito C.
338. CORDIA, Marthe Lois V.
339. CORONEL, Anna Karina A.
340. CORONEL, Jeffrey Jefferson Y.
341. CORPUZ, Emmanuel Rico C.
342. CORRAL, Claire B.
343. CORRO, Andrew C.
344. CORTES, Lee Owen P.
345. CORTEZ, Vida A.
346. CORTEZANO, Marwin M.
347. COSTALES, Leslie D.
348. CRISOSTOMO, Jeremiah N.
349. CRISTOBAL, Laurrie Layne P.
350. CRUZ, Anna Liza R.
351. CRUZ, Celeste Marie R.
352. CRUZ, Consuelo L.
353. CRUZ, Din-din A.
354. CRUZ, Elbert S.
355. CRUZ, Francis Joseph A.
356. CRUZ, Guia Perpetua C.
357. CRUZ, Jaymark SJ.
358. CRUZ-ABRENICA, Ma. Sophia Editha C.
359. CU, Robespierre S.
360. CUADRAS, Christian Arfel B.
361. CUBERO, Ela Michelle S.
362. CUDAL, Efren S.
363. CUNANAN, Rowena S.
364. CUPIDA, Febie A.
365. CURA, Amando M.
366. CURAMENG, Mary Ann T.
367. CURVA, Peter Marcu G.
368. DADULLA, Marites D.
369. DAGANTA, Shirley R.
370. DALIVA, Kristina Marie D.
371. DAMASCO, Alvy B.
372. DAMONDAMON, Mark Michael G.
373. DANCEL, Rojie G.
374. DAOAS, Pio Windale A.
375. DAPANAS, Lex Michelle M.
376. DAPON, JR., Loreto J.
377. DAPUL, Rhodalyne E.
378. DASING, Perlita DP.
379. DATUDACULA, Jamil D.
380. DATUDACULA, Normina M.
381. DAUZ, Roselea M.
382. DAVID, J. Krisley C.
383. DAYANDAYAN, Milreysa S.
384. DAYANDAYAN, JR., Remegio C.
385. DAYRIT, Chelin Y.
386. DAYRIT, Decruso P.
387. DE ANGEL, Jerlyn D.
388. DE AUSTRIA, Blisselda G.
389. DE CLARO, Christine Joanne F.
390. DE GUIA, Anne Mhiren Claudine D.
391. DE GUZMAN, Carmela Joy R.
392. DE GUZMAN, Ederlita V.
393. DE GUZMAN, Jay B.
394. DE GUZMAN, Soraida A.
395. DE GUZMAN, Vera M.
396. DE GUZMAN, JR., Glenn Ceasar T.
397. DE JESUS, Precy C.
398. DE JESUS, Remedios V.
399. DE JESUS, Roman Miguel G.
400. DE LA PAZ, Luis Gregorio Jesus B.
401. DE LA TORRE, Mailene M.
402. DE LARA, Elizabeth Alexandra Mary A.
403. DE LEON, Alaya M.
404. DE LEON, Dennis Carlos Rogaciano C.
405. DE LEON, Dino Robert L.
406. DE LEON, John Paul V.
407. DE LEON, Katrina P.
408. DE LEON, Pantas M.
409. DE LOS REYES, Kristine Margaret R.
410. DE LOS REYES, Teodula B.
411. DE LOS SANTOS, Mary Grace G.
412. DE QUIROZ, Napoleon C.
413. DE VERA, Celeste A.
414. DE VERA, Marichelle DT.
415. DEE, Ma. Gemma M.
416. DEGAMO, Wilhelmo M.
417. DEGOLLADO, Ethel Marie G.
418. DEL CASTILLO, Anna Patricia R.
419. DEL ROSARIO, Aldrich C.
420. DEL ROSARIO, Julie Fe A.
421. DEL ROSARIO, Rowena A.
422. DELA CERNA, Orville T.
423. DELA CRUZ, Joan M.
424. DELA CRUZ, JR., Anastacio R.
425. DELA CRUZ, JR., Epifanio C.
426. DELA FUENTE, Abigail R.
427. DELA FUENTE, Juan Miguel Victor C.
428. DELA PAZ, Ronald Ray O.
429. DELA PEÑA, Jonalyn D.
430. DELA ROSA, Abigail R.
431. DELAMIDE, Adan T.
432. DELGADO, Wilma H.
433. DELGADO, JR., Enrico B.
434. DELIMA, Ma. Chat H.
435. DELLOSO, Prince Gil F.
436. DELORIA, Kim E.
437. DELOS SANTOS, Josefina Maria Procesa L.
438. DEPASUCAT, Reyna Faith B.
439. DEQUILLA, Christopher L.
440. DERLA, Brenda Y.
441. DESAMPARADO, Ma. Johanna P.
442. DESCALZO, Jose Ariel M.
443. DETICIO, Aileen Grace U.
444. DEVANADERA, Anna Noreen T.
445. DEYTO, Melinda D.
446. DIAZ, Noriel D.
447. DIAZ, Rei Alessandro L.
448. DIMACALI, Adrian P.
449. DIMAILIG, Maricris T.
450. DIMALIG, Ma. Wengel Lou S.
451. DINAMLING, Dick Mark D.
452. DINGAL, Ailene L.
453. DIONALDO, Junald S.
454. DIOSO, Armand B.
455. DIRIGE, Chelsea Segunda G.
456. DIVINAGRACIA, Lenore Angeline L.
457. DIVINAGRACIA, Mae S.
458. DIVINO, Reichelle S.
459. DOMANTAY, Valerie Grace F.
460. DOMINGO, Andrix D.
461. DOMINGO, Osana Theresa D.
462. DOMINGO, Sherwin E.
463. DOMINGO, Tristan Dwight P.
464. DOMINGUEZ, Lovely P.
465. DONASCO, Edgar Alan A.
466. DORADO, Rilt Renart G.
467. DORIA, Marites Q.
468. DORIA, Richard Joseph C.
469. DOROMAL, Jose Joel P.
470. DUMAMA, Sha Elijah B.
471. DUMBAB, Harvey A.
472. DUMLAO, Jovian Jubert S.
473. DUMLAO, Melchor B.
474. DUMPILO, Eric Anthony A.
475. DUQUE, Gonzalito Nicolo E.
476. DURA, Blair M.
477. DY, Kristina Irene C.
478. DYBONGCO, Levi N.
479. DYCHIAO, Lorraine N.
480. EBILLO, Russel L.
481. ECHIVERRI, Juan Crisostomo M.
482. ECLAR, Clarence M.
483. EDDING, Jihan El R.
484. EDILLOR, Kathleen T.
485. EJES, Reynaldo R.
486. ELERIA, Elmer D.
487. ELIZALDE, Peter Bill C.
488. ELOPRE, Rojane C.
489. ELVEÑA, Christine Angelica B.
490. EMPINO, Arolf C.
491. ENTICA, Mellany V.
492. ERALDO-ARNUCO, Marcia Monina L.
493. ERNIE, Rachelle DG.
494. ESCUETA, III, Emilio D.
495. ESPAÑO, Mary Trish R.
496. ESPAÑOL, Diosdado C.
497. ESPAÑOL, Fritzzie Lyn F.
498. ESPEJO, Dhylyne Enchon B.
499. ESPERA, Woody John G.
500. ESPINOSA, Benjie G.
501. ESPINOSA, Maria Karla L.
502. ESPIRITU, Roel S.
503. ESTARES, Erwin P.
504. ESTAÑO, Heinjie B.
505. ESTILO, Chatru Anthony C.
506. ESTIMADA, Eric O.
507. EUGENIO, Christopher G.
508. EVANGELISTA, Ignacio F.
509. EVANGELISTA, Maria Ghia C.
510. EVANGELISTA, Ronald Brian G.
511. EXAMEN, Hannah D.
512. EXCONDE, Caroline G.
513. FABELLA, Caryl Kate S.
514. FABI, Joycery V.
515. FABILA, Eni Grace B.
516. FAJARDO, Ann Laurice A.
517. FAJARDO, Marlon G.
518. FAJARDO, Ria Divina I.
519. FALCULAN-MARI, Ma. Rowena D.
520. FAMA, Castelo Angelo T.
521. FANLO, Jaime Eduardo R.
522. FANLO, Mei Loraine C.
523. FANTONE, Ronald A.
524. FERNANDEZ, Francis A.
525. FERNANDEZ, Joselito D.
526. FERNANDEZ, Rommel P.
527. FERNANDEZ, Teodoro Lorenzo A.
528. FERNANDO, Janina Marie S.
529. FERRARIS, Wilt P.
530. FERRER, Dennis B.
531. FESALBON, Brenda Rhea F.
532. FESTEJO, Ryan Ed T.
533. FIANZA, Jinky Joar D.
534. FIDEL, Cyril C.
535. FIEL, Jasmin R.
536. FIGUEROA, Eddalaine M.
537. FLORA, Vanessa B.
538. FLORES, Arthur C.
539. FLORES, Chuchie L.
540. FLORES, Galerie Gee Y.
541. FLORES, Milette Socorro S.
542. FLORES, Sim C.
543. FLORES, Zargibran Adolben R.
544. FLORESE, Jose Frederick P.
545. FONTILLAS, Hyacinth T.
546. FORAYO, Christina P.
547. FORTUNO, Loretta Renie R.
548. FRANCISCO, Carlos Raphael N.
549. FRANCISCO, Kristine C.
550. FRANCO, Fatima Kristine J.
551. FUA, Marforth T.
552. GABALLO, Joyce B.
553. GABRIEL, Abegail C.
554. GABRIELES, Omar T.
555. GACUTNO, Jerry V.
556. GADRINAB, Fermin Nestor A.
557. GADUANG-ROJALES, Anita A.
558. GALA, Ana Siela M.
559. GALAURAN, John Michael S.
560. GALAY, Lani S.
561. GALLEROS, Cecille P.
562. GAMALINDA, Cheryl S.
563. GAMBONG, Lilyn D.
564. GAMONNAC, Florendo D.
565. GAN, Paula Katherina A.
566. GAN, III, Joaquin N.
567. GANALON, John Paul R.
568. GAPOL, JR., Flaviano T.
569. GAPOY, Lei Adrian V.
570. GARCES, Michael M.
571. GARCIA, Czarina B.
572. GARCIA, Jorge M.
573. GARCIA, Katherine Mari S.
574. GARGARITA, Claire Anne R.
575. GARIANDO, Ivy P.
576. GARINGARAO, May C.
577. GARLITOS, Kenneth Vincent J.
578. GARRIDO, Maria Cecilia M.
579. GATCHALIAN, Michal L.
580. GAYETA-ANDAYA, Catherine Joy S.
581. GAYON, Dorothy L.
582. GAYOSA, Tracy Ann M.
583. GEMENTIZA, Frederick A.
584. GENETIANO, Maureen R.
585. GENISE, Henida G.
586. GERADA, Jay P.
587. GERODIAS, Jillina M.
588. GERONA, Christian D.
589. GERONILLA, Beatriz O.
590. GERONIMO, Cesar C.
591. GERVASIO, Lianne Marie R.
592. GO, Aaron D.
593. GO, Angel Love M.
594. GO, Helene D.
595. GO, James G.
596. GO, Kirby C.
597. GO, Madonna Santa D.
598. GO, Maria Leonita Q.
599. GO, JR., Lito A.
600. GOC-ONG, Vanessa B.
601. GODINEZ, Christopher Lyndon N.
602. GOLLABA, JR., Gabriel L.
603. GOMEZ, Armeen Alain B.
604. GONZAGA, Johans S.
605. GONZAGA, Rosanne Juliana R.
606. GONZALES, Gerald S.
607. GONZALES, Sheryl V.
608. GONZALES, II, Marcelino R.
609. GRAGASIN, Manny V.
610. GRAN, Adriel B.
611. GRANDE, Alexander Francis C.
612. GUANZON, Woodro L.
613. GUARINO-RIVERA, Leila Magda N.
614. GUERRA, Ed Anthony F.
615. GUERRA, Reah B.
616. GUERRA-DE LA VEGA, Anna Marie Mae R.
617. GUICO, Maria Laarni Sheila S.
618. GUILING, Hosni L.
619. GUILLERMO, Virgin Rose Sharon P.
620. GUIMBATAN, Sandra M.
621. GUINA, Rene Andrew A.
622. GUIPO, Maria Primarisa C.
623. GUMPAL, Dante Gil D.
624. GUTIERREZ, Andrea L.
625. GUZMAN, Jacqueline A.
626. GUZMAN, Josefina A.
627. HAMCHAWAN, Judith B.
628. HERMOSISIMA, Honorato Carlo C.
629. HERNANDEZ, Cheryl A.
630. HERNANDEZ, JR., Celso J.
631. HERNANDO, Cherry Chiara L.
632. HERRERA, Georgia May L.
633. HIZON, Joaquin Miguel Z.
634. HORCA, III, Jesus Manuel A.
635. HORTIZ, Michelle L.
636. HUBAHIB, Mariano C.
637. HUMILDE, Philip N.
638. HURTADO, Ghia Chrystellyne O.
639. IBRAHIM, Ysnaira A.
640. ILAGAN, JR., Casiano A.
641. ILAO, Julan C.
642. ILARDE, Maila Katrina Y.
643. IMPERIAL, Dinah F.
644. IMPERIAL, Paul Rodulfo B.
645. INDAR, Rahma A.
646. INOTURAN, Florinda P.
647. INTERIOR, Enrico S.
648. JABAL, Joel J.
649. JABSON, Eugene Oliver M.
650. JACOB, Jamael A.
651. JACOBO-GRECIA, Nemia S.
652. JANDUSAY, Marie Bernadette M.
653. JAPZON, Maria Jeanette A.
654. JARANILLA, Cedric S.
655. JATICO-NUÑEZ, Janeth G.
656. JAUD, Myra Jennifer D.
657. JAUDINES, Sheryl C.
658. JAVIER, Z 19 S.
659. JOVEN, Emil Karlo L.
660. JUMALON, Joel Jonn U.
661. JURIAL, Niño Jim B.
662. JUSTINIANI, JR., Romeo S.
663. KANAPI, Roberto Ricardo O.
664. KUONG, Dennis C.
665. LABIAL, JR., Ricardo P.
666. LABOG, Norberto Pocholo P.
667. LABRADOR, Chaveli Joan O.
668. LABUSTRO-GARCIA, Jacquelyn A.
669. LACAMBRA, JR., Modesto C.
670. LAGAT, Eileen Mae B.
671. LAGMAN, Mary Rosary D.
672. LAGMAY, Aries John P.
673. LAIZ-DE VILLA, Ma. Theresa S.
674. LAM, Jennifer T.
675. LAMA, Michelle T.
676. LAMIGO, Richard L.
677. LAMPA, Rex D.
678. LANTION, Maria Camille G.
679. LAO, Dave Y.
680. LAO, Jewelle Y.
681. LAPPAY, JR., Gregorio A.
682. LAPUZ, Rosalie T.
683. LASAFIN, II, Adler Mari Eriberto L.
684. LASCANO, Jasper Alberto H.
685. LASTIMADO, Marvin P.
686. LAURE, Adonis A.
687. LAURE, Quijano S.
688. LAUREL, Marivic DL.
689. LAYUMAS-CELESTE, Edelyn A.
690. LEAGOGO, Adrianne Daniel L.
691. LEGARTO, Mary Ann C.
692. LEGASPI, Faith Henriet B.
693. LEONARDO, Melissa N.
694. LEPAIL, Jehan-jehan A.
695. LERO, John Paul Huey V.
696. LEYSON, Ian Peter A.
697. LIBARDO, Arlene Mae L.
698. LIBRADO, Leah A.
699. LIBUIT, Grace P.
700. LIDASAN, Jehan B.
701. LILAGAN, Jean P.
702. LIM, Anthony Lemuel T.
703. LIM, Antonio Paolo S.
704. LIM, Beatriz Paz Dominique D.
705. LIM, Dominadoranne I.
706. LIM, Edward Allan P.
707. LIM, Eileen D.
708. LIM, Frederick Charles Y.
709. LIM, Irene C.
710. LIM, Joanne M.
711. LIM, Lloyd Steven L.
712. LIM, JR., Menandro T.
713. LIMA, Cherry Joie B.
714. LIMBO, Charo C.
715. LINSANGAN, Jose A.
716. LIWAG, Monica T.
717. LIWALUG, Fatimah S.
718. LIZA-TORRES, Connie P.
719. LLARENA, Geoffrey H.
720. LLAVE, Lynda
721. LLAVE, Maria Isabel M.
722. LLENARES, Kathleen E.
723. LLIDO, Christian B.
724. LLOBRERA, Santy B.
725. LOAYON, Wildebrandt C.
726. LOBEDICA, Clyde Lelith S.
727. LOBERIO, Jonathan D.
728. LOBIANO, Maria Lourdes M.
729. LOBO, Numer P.
730. LOMAS-E, JR., Bonifacio Craig Y.
731. LONGALONG, Carol P.
732. LONTOC, Maureen DR.
733. LOPEZ, Erwin N.
734. LOPEZ, Gloria Monica S.
735. LOPEZ, Grace Marie
736. LOPEZ, Irish T.
737. LOPEZ, Jose Manuel A.
738. LOPEZ, Lea Mabel P.
739. LOPEZ, Lionel L.
740. LOPEZ, Maria Aurora Celestina M.
741. LOPEZ-BILAOEN, Nancy R.
742. LOPINGCO, Sharina Marie U.
743. LORENZANA, Gina L.
744. LORENZO, Jason T.
745. LU, Anna Victoria M.
746. LU, Sheila U.
747. LUI, Jonah Grace L.
748. LUMAGUI-SAYOTO, Marinela D.
749. LUMBATAN, Alexis M.
750. LUNA, Don Angelo S.
751. LUNA, Sandra A.
752. LUY, Ruby M.
753. MAALAT, Yvanna DL.
754. MAATA, Michael Oliver B.
755. MABANAG, Zeus R.
756. MABANGLO, Mildred Ann Q.
757. MABANSAG, Ivy B.
758. MABAZZA, Cristina A.
759. MABUTAS, Jesus Servando S.
760. MACAPAGAL, Richelle Joy P.
761. MACARAIG, Allan Reiz C.
762. MACARILAY, Florante C.
763. MADAMBA, Marvelous M.
764. MADAYAG, Irene Mae R.
765. MADULID, Lea T.
766. MAESTRADO-APARICIO, Jona T.
767. MAGBANUA, Pearl Sheila S.
768. MAGBANUA, JR., Manuel M.
769. MAGCAWAS, Allison T.
770. MAGNO-ZARATE, Citedina U.
771. MAGPANTAY, Anthea A.
772. MAGPANTAY-NG, Maricel M.
773. MAGRACIA, Herschel F.
774. MAGSINO, Carmi D.
775. MAGUAD, Zha-zha R.
776. MAHAMUD, John-christopher T.
777. MAILOM, Renniel C.
778. MALASA, Angelica O.
779. MALIAWAO, Anwar Khalid U.
780. MALLARI, II, Roberto P.
781. MANALABE, Grandis Rem T.
782. MANALANG, Kristina C.
783. MANALO, Jose Miguel S.
784. MANALO, Juan C.
785. MANANSALA, Edwin C.
786. MANCAO, Cecille B.
787. MANINGDING, Cadeiah B.
788. MANIS, Teliano L.
789. MANLOSA, Armi Lyn B.
790. MANLUYANG, Jeoffrey C.
791. MANUEL, Harlynne Monette M.
792. MANUEL, Olive Jane S.
793. MARASIGAN, Christopher Rey C.
794. MARCOS, Mary Jenneane R.
795. MARMOL, Fidelito L.
796. MARQUEZ, Edwin U.
797. MARQUEZ, Jal A.
798. MARRERO, Evelyn A.
799. MARTIN, Monica M.
800. MARTINEZ, Cherry M.
801. MARTINEZ, Janet L.
802. MARTIR, Karla May O.
803. MASANGKAY, Emmerly Jane D.
804. MATE, Michael Vincent A.
805. MATIBAG, Julius G.
806. MATILA, Rodelio S.
807. MAULION, Mischelle R.
808. MAXILOM, Marvin S.
809. MAXINO, Nancy A.
810. MAÑAGO, Sheryl M.
811. MEDIJA, Louela Lynne M.
812. MEJIA, Cecille L.
813. MEJIA, Maritess T.
814. MELECIO-VILLEJO, Ruby L.
815. MELITANTE, Christian George L.
816. MENDEZ, Geraldine C.
817. MENDINUETO, Erwin Edward P.
818. MENDOZA, Anna Charisse L.
819. MENDOZA, Kim Grace A.
820. MENDOZA, Marlon M.
821. MENDOZA, Mary Ann P.
822. MENDOZA, Mayette M.
823. MENDOZA, Perfecto Justino A.
824. MENESES, Geraldine S.
825. MERCADO, Daiza Anne O.
826. MERCADO, Erickson Donn R.
827. MERCADO, Katherine C.
828. MERCADO, JR., Wilfred A.
829. MERNADO, JR., Michael M.
830. MEÑEZ, Kristine Joy M.
831. MIANO, Diana Marie P.
832. MIGRIÑO, Jason R.
833. MILAN, Jurgens SJ.
834. MILLA, Patricia C.
835. MIOLE, Kristofferlean A.
836. MIRANDA, JR., Reinerio G.
837. MISOLA, Gladys V.
838. MITRA, JR., Elmer R.
839. MONDRAGON, Iannoel V.
840. MONGAYA, Anna Khristine C.
841. MONTEALEGRE, Theodore Allan M.
842. MONTEMAYOR, Adrian R.
843. MONTENEGRO, Allen L.
844. MONTERO, Osmond M.
845. MONTEZA, Angelica Diane B.
846. MORALES, Anthony Lawrence M.
847. MORALES, Cynthia Evangeline D.
848. MORALES, Eufel N.
849. MORALES, Giovanni R.
850. MORALES, Leilani C.
851. MORALES, Michelle Frances L.
852. MORANO, IV, Rene Cornelio R.
853. MORENO, JR., Oscar P.
854. MORENO, JR., Paulino H.
855. MUYCO, Mary Love P.
856. NABUA, John Paul PA.
857. NACIONALES, JR., Rafael D.
858. NAFIANOG, Roger L.
859. NAMBATAC, Dave U.
860. NANGKIL, Philip Ray L.
861. NAPARATE, Arsenia A.
862. NARAJOS, Patricia D.
863. NARANJO, Christine Marie L.
864. NARISMA, Juevanrey A.
865. NATANAUAN, Klarisa L.
866. NAVARRO, Tina B.
867. NEFALAR, Marissa Corazon T.
868. NEIS, Maebe T.
869. NEPOMUCENO, Roviel B.
870. NERY, Melanie Johanna C.
871. NGOCHUA, Patricia Cristina T.
872. NICOLAS, Arvil Philipp A.
873. NICOLAS, Donnaliza A.
874. NICOLAS, Jonathan C.
875. NORA, Paula Katrina L.
876. NOVERO, Brian DS.
877. NUESTRO, Glenn Michael P.
878. NUEVE, Theresa Genevieve C..
879. OBILLOS, Maria Yasmin M.
880. OBIÑA, Eve Jonapaula M.
881. OCAMPO, Robert V.
882. OCAMPO, Shierma F.
883. OCAÑADA-ALEGRE, Amelie O.
884. OCFEMIA, Emil M.
885. OLAÑO, Sheryl L.
886. OLINGAY, Stephen C.
887. OMADTO, JR., Arnold Ninoy P.
888. OMELIO, Princess Claudin C.
889. OMPAD, Julius T.
890. ONA, Mercedita L.
891. ONG, Jennifer T.
892. ORBITA, Janis Mahalia A.
893. ORCULLO, Sora Dereka T.
894. ORENCIA, Janice Rhea B.
895. ORENCIO, Leah May L.
896. OROPESA, Cyril C.
897. ORPILLA, Michelle O.
898. ORTEGA, Noel M.
899. OUANO, Ethelbert B.
900. PABALINAS, Michael D.
901. PABELLAN, Abouben Jade R.
902. PABIONA, Esther Joy P.
903. PABLO, Jessibel M.
904. PACASEM, Nurhani C.
905. PADATE, Faizal A.
906. PAGAYATAN, Alfred T.
907. PALAC, Lemuel G.
908. PALENCIA, JR., Chulo B.
909. PALILEO, Alena Gale H.
910. PALINES, Erwin B.
911. PALMA, Pilipinas C.
912. PAMINTUAN, Dennis Albert S.
913. PAMMIT, Mari Khris R.
914. PAMONAG, Noli Rey L.
915. PAMPOLINA, Jonathan T.
916. PANER, Linda Lucky Grace C.
917. PANES, Anfred P.
918. PANES, JR., Rolando D.
919. PANGANIBAN, Avigail E.
920. PANGILINAN, Beverly F.
921. PANHON, Raymond G.
922. PARADELA, Glenn Raymond O.
923. PARAISO, Renato A.
924. PARAS, Joannah A.
925. PARONG, Joel Joselito G.
926. PASATIEMPO, Herlyn L.
927. PASCO, Novern Irish A.
928. PASCUAL, Joshua F.
929. PASCUAL, Urvi B.
930. PASION, Paul Emerson M.
931. PASTOR, Noel R.
932. PATALINJUG, Liza Marie S.
933. PATCHO, Jerry B.
934. PAULINO, Carlo A.
935. PAULINO, Paulo A.
936. PAYUMO, Caroline C.
937. PAYUMO, Marie Joy M.
938. PAZ, A.j. Gerardo T.
939. PAÑALES, Rhyan M.
940. PERALTA, Ramses S.
941. PEREDO, Eldric Paul A.
942. PERERA, Jason Bader LL.
943. PEREZ, Lyndon Gabriel C.
944. PEREZ-FERRER, Ruby C.
945. PEÑAFLOR, Aldrin G.
946. PEÑARANDA, Jose Rommel A.
947. PEÑARANDA, Rhyna M.
948. PEÑAS, Stella J.
949. PICCIO, Agnes A.
950. PICIO, Jubal R.
951. PILAR, Joy B.
952. PINEDA, Marco K.
953. PINTOR, Arminda T.
954. PIZARRO, Edwin Joy L.
955. PIÑGA, Vibenditho J.
956. PLACIDO, Lady Liza R.
957. PLAZA, Gaudenis Felix E.
958. POJAS, Philip John L.
959. PONDEMIRA, Katrina B.
960. POPANES, Alex Alberto M.
961. POQUIZ, JR., Eduardo U.
962. PORMENTILLA, Jeland Omer L.
963. PORTOZA, Elyjean D.
964. PORTUGAL, Russel P.
965. POSADAS, John Philip A.
966. POSADAS, Raymond Charles N.
967. POTICANO, Joselita M.
968. PRADO, Reigel A.
969. PREZA, Irma R.
970. PRIELA, Diomer L.
971. PRIETO, Mark Anthony S.
972. PUA, Ian Dominic M.
973. PUEDA, Anna Liza S.
974. PUGEDA, Jordan Neil S.
975. PUJANES, Jay P.
976. PUNO, JR., Rogelio D.
977. PY, Ailyn S.
978. QUANICO, JR., Leonardo B.
979. QUINSAYAS, Prima Jesusa B.
980. QUINTO, Salvador Henry H.
981. QUIROS, Jolex M.
982. QUIROZ, Bernadette V.
983. RABANES, Antonita C.
984. RABANG, Luisa A.
985. RABE, Mark Pepito J.
986. RACHO, Gerald B.
987. RAFAEL, Hyacinth E.
988. RAGSAC, Arceli C.
989. RAMIREZ, Cecily Nerisse C.
990. RAMIREZ, Doris G.
991. RAMIREZ, Renato Oliver A.
992. RAMIREZ, JR., Alfredo O.
993. RAMOS, Beatrix I.
994. RAMOS, Carmen Grace S.
995. RAMOS, Janice Kristine R.
996. RAMOS, Lesalie M.
997. RAMOS, Liza Michelle E.
998. RAMOS, Rechie N.
999. RAMOS, Reezann Keith E.
1000. RAMOS, Ricardo Victor K.
1001. RAMOS, JR., Eduardo F.
1002. RANGGA, Gleenes Dave T.
1003. RAVAL, Jose Roy B.
1004. RAYA, Brando Ray P.
1005. RAYEL, Rosette R.
1006. RAÑESES, Lezelda M.
1007. REAS-POLISTICO, Rosemarie Ann A.
1008. REBUYON, Wilfredo C.
1009. RECOLIZADO, Ma. Nerissa S.
1010. REGALA, Amie T.
1011. REGALADO, Ma. Ruiza L.
1012. RENTUMA, Juneth A.
1013. REPASO, Jayson G.
1014. REPOL, Judy Alice U.
1015. REYES, Ajay Noreen DS.
1016. REYES, Amanda Regina G.
1017. REYES, Ellen C.
1018. REYES, John Albert T.
1019. REYES, Luz Victoria F.
1020. REYES, Maria Teresa V.
1021. REYES, Mary Ann L.
1022. REYES, Mylene R.
1023. REYES, Ronces Anne S.
1024. REYES, Wendy S.
1025. RIALUBIN, Arlyne I.
1026. RICO, Reywin M.
1027. RIEZA, Sylvia Patricia S.
1028. RIGOR, Maritess R.
1029. RIODIQUE, Karen Anne S.
1030. RIVERA, Alexander A.
1031. RIVERA, Alexander Paul T.
1032. RIVERA, Dante Y.
1033. RIVERA, Jonah P.
1034. RIVERA, Maria Concepcion E.
1035. ROBLES, Joan A.
1036. ROBLES, Margarette T.
1037. RODRIGUEZ, Albert Leonard C.
1038. RODRIGUEZ, Christopher A.
1039. RODRIGUEZ, Irish Mae V.
1040. ROJAS-QUIAMBAO, Merriam Fe G.
1041. ROJO, Rosemarie A.
1042. ROMERO, Rowena V.
1043. RONQUILLO, Victor John Paul H.
1044. ROSALES, May Ann R.
1045. ROSALES, Rosario L.
1046. ROSARIO, Enrico R.
1047. ROSAURO, Allan A.
1048. ROSELL, Collin N.
1049. ROXAS, Vernidia M.
1050. RUBAYA, Maria Salve C.
1051. RUBIN, Krissi Shaffina Twyla A.
1052. RUBIO, Maria Catherina G.
1053. RUCKENBROD, Janis Roselle S.
1054. RUIZ, Erwin G.
1055. SABADO, Susan Phoebe R.
1056. SABANGAN, Charina G.
1057. SABER, Raya Avariza V.
1058. SABITSANA, Clemens Angeli B.
1059. SABUNDAYO, Maria Lourdes A.
1060. SACABEN, Rico Leo R.
1061. SACEDON, Janice S.
1062. SACEDON, Oliver M.
1063. SADURAL, Emma Rhea B.
1064. SALAGAN, Decimary DC.
1065. SALATAN, Gideon C.
1066. SALDUA-CASTILLO, Cherry Vi M.
1067. SALEM, Sylvia Jean P.
1068. SALIBAD, JR., David S.
1069. SALINAS, Frances Shanelle G.
1070. SALINAS, Pierre Nikolai M.
1071. SALOMEO, Conrado A.
1072. SALVADOR, Noel N.
1073. SALVANERA, Christian Joyce P.
1074. SALVE, Lalaine P.
1075. SAMANIEGO, Windel Z.
1076. SAMERA, Maria Lovella C.
1077. SAMONTE, Erwin Jonas A.
1078. SAMPAGA, Steven M.
1079. SAMPANG, Darrell Enerico I.
1080. SAMPAYAN, Rexreginald T.
1081. SAMSON, Sean Blenn E.
1082. SAN JUAN, Ernesto C.
1083. SANCHEZ, Analiza D.
1084. SANCHEZ, Dionne Marie M.
1085. SANCHEZ, Donna May P.
1086. SANCHEZ, Yehlen D.
1087. SANDE, Stephanie P.
1088. SANDOVAL, Ronald C.
1089. SANGALANG, Marlene O.
1090. SANOY, Sharon Grace S.
1091. SANTIAGO, Dominador O.
1092. SANTIAGO, Gwen Manuel P.
1093. SANTOS, Agnes B.
1094. SANTOS, Angelo Niño B.
1095. SANTOS, Charlie O.
1096. SANTOS, Rhoesel Ammiel M.
1097. SAQUING, Christine C.
1098. SARCEDA, Ryan R.
1099. SARINAS, Karen Mae G.
1100. SARMIENTO, Jorge Franco S.
1101. SARMIENTO, Maria Robina C.
1102. SARMIENTO, III, Jes Gal B.
1103. SARMIENTO, III, Leonardo A.
1104. SAULOG-MARASIGAN, Macy G.
1105. SAWIT, Clifton James F.
1106. SAY, Loma Linda A.
1107. SAYOG, Arnolita F.
1108. SAÑOSA, JR., Juanito L.
1109. SEBASTIAN, Mia Mary G.
1110. SEBASTIAN, Yolanda S.
1111. SEBIANO, Teresa G.
1112. SEMPRON, Josie C.
1113. SERON, Eugene S.
1114. SEVILLA, Anna Camille L.
1115. SIAPNO-CAGUNGAO, Alma E.
1116. SIBUYAN, Brian Gale T.
1117. SICANGCO, Maria Cecilia T.
1118. SILLA, Merielle T.
1119. SILO, JR., Benjamin H.
1120. SIMTIM, JR., Eufemio A.
1121. SINGSON, Ma. Veronique R.
1122. SINGSON, Michael Thor C.
1123. SIOCO, Kyan John B.
1124. SIONGCO, Emmie-lou L.
1125. SIRON, Jennifer G.
1126. SISON, Aireen D.
1127. SISON, Emmeree C.
1128. SITES, Nilda V.
1129. SITOY, Leighna Katrina S.
1130. SOBREJUANITE, Roev Bryl T.
1131. SOJOR, Ryan T.
1132. SOLIS, Ceasar Anthony S.
1133. SOLIS, Edson S.
1134. SOLIS, III, Emmanuel B.
1135. SOLOMON, JR., Juan B.
1136. SONGCO, Amiel R.
1137. SOPEÑA, Joicel C.
1138. SORIANO, Jerrylee D.
1139. SORIANO, Omar A.
1140. SORIANO, Zeldania DT.
1141. SORILLA, Mark Anthony C.
1142. SORILLA, Mark Christer A.
1143. SORIÑO, Paul B.
1144. SOTTO, Rhine F.
1145. STA. CRUZ, Benedict S.
1146. STA. MARIA, Odessa T.
1147. STUART DEL ROSARIO, Rendo C.
1148. SUAREZ, Dario O.
1149. SUAREZ, Juan Alfonso D.
1150. SUAZO, Alvin G.
1151. SUMEDCA, Rommel H.
1152. SUPERABLE, Clarissa M.
1153. SURELL, Ma. Excelsis R.
1154. SURIL, Ethel Rea G.
1155. SUYAT, Franklin L.
1156. SZE, Abigail T.
1157. TAACA, Baby Lyn B.
1158. TACIO, Swanerrie Sangshell C.
1159. TADENA, Rex A.
1160. TAGARDA, Luis Karlo R.
1161. TAGLE, Sharon D.
1162. TAMAYO, Kristine Jazz V.
1163. TAMAYO, Zulieca L.
1164. TAMBOL, Jonathan B.
1165. TAN, Janice Jade V.
1166. TAN, Ma. Cecilia S.
1167. TAN, Rose Macrina Q.
1168. TAN, Vivian S.
1169. TANDOG, Jonathan G.
1170. TANSINSIN, Arthur G.
1171. TAPIA, Judilyn H.
1172. TAVAS-TAN, Marichu G.
1173. TEH, Shergine C.
1174. TEJERO, Robert John M.
1175. TENG, Bavilyn C.
1176. TEOXON, Art R.
1177. TEVES, Eugene C.
1178. TEVES, Irene Joyce T.
1179. TEVES, Niña Rica R.
1180. TI, Marl Chester Y.
1181. TIANCO, Elizabeth Amelia V.
1182. TIBON, Rheia G.
1183. TIMBOL, Jennifer L.
1184. TIN, Jovy June E.
1185. TINGSON, Mary Genevieve F.
1186. TIUNAYAN, Rolan A.
1187. TIZON, Sheryl Ann D.
1188. TOGLE, Maria Inez C.
1189. TOKIAS, Joey G.
1190. TOLEDO, Hermie Jun S.
1191. TOLENTINO, Claudette C.
1192. TOLENTINO, Jose Mari F.
1193. TOLENTINO, Nadia Marie D.
1194. TOLENTINO, III, Avelino D.
1195. TOLETE, Gladys Pinky D.
1196. TOLIMAO, Sandy J.
1197. TOMAS, Eric M.
1198. TOMON, Edwin M.
1199. TOMOTORGO, Ricky P.
1200. TORBELA, Venus A.
1201. TORIBIO, Elmer G.
1202. TORRALBA, Mary Grace Y.
1203. TORREGOSA, Jonell M.
1204. TORRES, Gregorio C.
1205. TORRES, Jason C.
1206. TORRES-ELACION, Chares Marie R.
1207. TOTAÑES, Maria Guillermina G.
1208. TRADIO, Alexander J.
1209. TRINIDAD, Cheryll Ann R.
1210. TRINIDAD, Christine S.
1211. TSANG, Jocelyn T.
1212. TUAZON, Ford G.
1213. TUBIGON-BACANG, Jerefe D.
1214. TUMAMPOS, Iris P.
1215. TUMANENG, Felix Jasper DC.
1216. TUMANENG, Rochelle Marie A.
1217. TUMBALI, Mediatrix S.
1218. TUMULAK, Maria Rosario Consuelo S.
1219. TUNGPALAN, Cheryl Ann A.
1220. TUPAS, Charo N.
1221. TUPAS, Rexter C.
1222. TUPAS, III, Alejandro M.
1223. TURIANO, Gerard N.
1224. TUTICA-VALLES, Genevieve B.
1225. TY, JR., Alfredo B.
1226. UAL, Jasmine Anne M.
1227. UMADHAY, Apollo J.
1228. UTZURRUM, Joanna Ruth T.
1229. UY, Jonathan Herbert C.
1230. UY, Voltaire S.
1231. UYAN, Aguinnaya D.
1232. VALDEZ, Almira B.
1233. VALDEZ, Edgard E.
1234. VALDEZ, JR., Rodrigo C.
1235. VALENCIA, Ian Christian M.
1236. VALENZUELA, Cyrus Paul S.
1237. VALENZUELA, JR., Carmelo L.
1238. VALERA, Charmi Christine F.
1239. VALLECER, Jan Hendrik I.
1240. VALLESPIN, Alex O.
1241. VARGAS, Ananias Christian G.
1242. VASQUEZ, Zarina Marie M.
1243. VELANDREZ, Jehn Louie W.
1244. VELASCO, Tricia Nicole Q.
1245. VELICARIA, Anthony Raymond M.
1246. VELOSO, Christine Antoinette M.
1247. VENTURA, Charissimae Y.
1248. VERDE, Rico O.
1249. VERGARA, John Dave G.
1250. VICERA, Christopher G.
1251. VICTORIO, Fides C.
1252. VIDAD, Owen M.
1253. VILLA, Oliver E.
1254. VILLALUZ, Randy S.
1255. VILLANTE, JR., Romeo L.
1256. VILLANUEVA, Emily Kristine C.
1257. VILLANUEVA, Henry C.
1258. VILLANUEVA, Jeremiah V.
1259. VILLANUEVA, Lovelyn A.
1260. VILLANUEVA, Marcianelle C.
1261. VILLANUEVA, Yolanda Y.
1262. VILLANUEVA, JR., Carlo C.
1263. VILLARIN, Earl Charles N.
1264. VILLARUBIA, Roseller P.
1265. VILLARUEL, Anthea R.
1266. VILLASERAN, Joel N.
1267. VILLEROZ, Francis C.
1268. VILLORDON, Jose Jonathan R.
1269. VINLUAN, Amiel Ronald R.
1270. VISTA, Guyla A.
1271. WAHAWA, Leticia P.
1272. WONG, Maciel C.
1273. YAMBAO, Kenneth B.
1274. YAMBOT, Rodrigo Dante C.
1275. YANCHA, Dashell C.
1276. YAP, Jeffry Jude T.
1277. YAP, Norman Brian P.
1278. YAP, Phillip John F.
1279. YAP, Rafael Christopher L.
1280. YAP, Raymond B.
1281. YAPHA, Maria Honeylette P.
1282. YMBALLA, Ragem V.
1283. YU, Ma. Felina Constancia B.
1284. YUHAYCO, Babel U.
1285. YUMUL, Ily Grace T.
1286. ZABALA, Jocelyn C.
1287. ZARAGOZA, Charmian Wyanet S.
1288. ZOLETA, Mark D.
1289. ZUÑO, Froilan Yñigo B.

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